commonplace blog

1. Your skin may never be perfect, and that’s okay.

2. Life is too short not to have the underwear, the coffee, and the haircut you want.

3. Everyone (including your family, your coworkers, and your best friend) will talk about you behind your back, and you’ll talk about them too. It doesn’t mean you don’t love each other.

4. It’s okay to spend money on things that make you happy.

5. Sometimes without fault or reason, relationships deteriorate. It will happen when you’re six, it will happen when you’re sixty. That’s life.

Five things I am trying very hard to accept (via aumoe)

thismighthurt:

Intimacy: The Whys, Hows, How-Nots, and So-Nots

A great Scarleteen article on intimacy by Heather Corinna with a few cute example illustrations! More illustrations in the article :)

Be kind to yourself. Stop telling yourself that whatever you are struggling with “should” be easy. If something is hard for you, it is hard for you. There are probably Reasons, though those may just be how you are wired. Acknowledge these things. When you finish something hard, be proud! Celebrate a little.

And really, just stop saying “should” to yourself about your thoughts and feelings in any context. You feel how you feel. The things in your head are the things in your head. You can’t change either directly through sheer force of will. You can only change what you do. Stop beating yourself up for who and what you are right now–it isn’t productive. Focus on moving forward.

Dear Goggles what happen on Free why is everyone on fire?

Dear Hats, Haru does not want to get in the robot.

itswalky:

comicsalliance:

COMICS’ NEW GOLDEN AGE: SPIKE TROTMAN TALKS TAKING DOWN THE GATEKEEPERS [INTERVIEW]
By Juliet Kahn
Spike Trotman is a visionary. She sees possibility where others throw their hands up in defeat. She sees innovation where others see stagnation. She is fundamentally optimistic about the future of comics — and why shouldn’t she be? Trotman has conducted massively successful Kickstarters — plural — organized some of the best talent in comics into anthologies like Smut Peddler and The Sleep of Reason, made money-producing Poorcraft (a comic about not having money), and, all the while, maintained Templar, Arizona, her long-running and beloved webcomic.
Comics have been good to Spike Trotman, but her success is very much the result of hard work and fresh thinking rather than chance — hard work that has left her one of the most interesting people in the industry. So, naturally, ComicsAlliance tracked down her booth at San Diego Comic-Con to talk Kickstarter foibles, “porn for chicks,” and a new golden age for comics.

Spike Trotman: Nowadays, the audience of people who call themselves comics readers… you can be an incredibly avid comics reader and never step foot in a shop. There are no more gatekeepers to that sort of fandom. What you need these days to be an avid comic reader is internet access. Without having to jump through editors who have to be concerned about bottom lines, appealing to the audience they currently have of 45-year-old men who want cape books.
You have these people who can put their stuff online on Tumblr, on Smack Jeeves, and that’s the curb they have to jump, and it’s lower than it’s ever been. And sure that means a lot of really low quality stuff gets online but that also means that some of the stuff that gets online is stuff that would normally not be seen as editorially viable at mainstream places, but has the potential to have a huge audience that’s just never been tapped before. I think about things like Homestuck when I say that, or Questionable Content. These were comics that wouldn’t even get a meeting at DC but you see the way the internet reacts to them and it just goes to show that there are people out there that want to read comics like this, they just haven’t been marketed to. I think that’s awesome, I’m all for what’s happening to comics. I think we’re in a golden age right now. Comics are more exciting now than they’ve ever been.

READ MORE

reeeeeadd iiiitt

itswalky:

comicsalliance:

COMICS’ NEW GOLDEN AGE: SPIKE TROTMAN TALKS TAKING DOWN THE GATEKEEPERS [INTERVIEW]

By Juliet Kahn

Spike Trotman is a visionary. She sees possibility where others throw their hands up in defeat. She sees innovation where others see stagnation. She is fundamentally optimistic about the future of comics — and why shouldn’t she be? Trotman has conducted massively successful Kickstarters — plural — organized some of the best talent in comics into anthologies like Smut Peddler and The Sleep of Reason, made money-producing Poorcraft (a comic about not having money), and, all the while, maintained Templar, Arizona, her long-running and beloved webcomic.

Comics have been good to Spike Trotman, but her success is very much the result of hard work and fresh thinking rather than chance — hard work that has left her one of the most interesting people in the industry. So, naturally, ComicsAlliance tracked down her booth at San Diego Comic-Con to talk Kickstarter foibles, “porn for chicks,” and a new golden age for comics.

Spike Trotman: Nowadays, the audience of people who call themselves comics readers… you can be an incredibly avid comics reader and never step foot in a shop. There are no more gatekeepers to that sort of fandom. What you need these days to be an avid comic reader is internet access. Without having to jump through editors who have to be concerned about bottom lines, appealing to the audience they currently have of 45-year-old men who want cape books.

You have these people who can put their stuff online on Tumblr, on Smack Jeeves, and that’s the curb they have to jump, and it’s lower than it’s ever been. And sure that means a lot of really low quality stuff gets online but that also means that some of the stuff that gets online is stuff that would normally not be seen as editorially viable at mainstream places, but has the potential to have a huge audience that’s just never been tapped before. I think about things like Homestuck when I say that, or Questionable Content. These were comics that wouldn’t even get a meeting at DC but you see the way the internet reacts to them and it just goes to show that there are people out there that want to read comics like this, they just haven’t been marketed to. I think that’s awesome, I’m all for what’s happening to comics. I think we’re in a golden age right now. Comics are more exciting now than they’ve ever been.

READ MORE

reeeeeadd iiiitt

atelierentomologica:


'Fireflies' (c.1930) by Japanese artist & printmaker Ohara Koson (1877-1945)

atelierentomologica:

'Fireflies' (c.1930) by Japanese artist & printmaker Ohara Koson (1877-1945)

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’. (via crankyskirt)

GO THE FUCK OFFFF

(via thagal)

cybergata:

Elephants walking through a rain forest.

cybergata:

Elephants walking through a rain forest.

People who dismiss the unemployed and dependent as ‘parasites’ fail to understand economics and parasitism. A successful parasite is one that is not recognized by its host, one that can make its host work for it without appearing as a burden. Such is the ruling class in a capitalist society.
Jason Read (via 90377)
septembriseur:

No headline will ever bring me as much joy as this.

septembriseur:

No headline will ever bring me as much joy as this.

Seriously, women make 77 cents to a man’s dollar, but own only 36% as much wealth – and the wealth gap between men and women has widened even as the income gap slowly narrows. Women who never married own 6 percent of the wealth of their bachelor brothers. It gets worse: black and Latino never-married women own a penny for every dollar of wealth controlled by men of their race. And of course, women make up almost two out of three adults living in poverty. Since the capacity to make big political donations is a factor of having disposable wealth, not just income, the wealth gap between men and women is the crucial factor behind the donor gap. That’s the main reason “why women don’t give.”
arabellesicardi:

prayforprada:

#AESTHETICS has gone wayy too far

who broke into @toolers apartment

arabellesicardi:

prayforprada:

#AESTHETICS has gone wayy too far

who broke into @toolers apartment

All organizing is science fiction. What does a world without poverty look like? What does a world without prisons look like? What does a world with everyone having enough food and clothing look like? We don’t know. It’s science fiction, and it is as foreign to us as the Klingon homeworld (which is called Q’onos in case you were wondering). But being able to envision it and imagine it means we can begin seeing the steps it would take to move us there.
mentalflossr:

What’s on the Other Side of the Ocean? (Click for larger view)

If you’re poor, the only way you’re likely to injure someone is the old traditional way: artisanal violence, we could call it – by hands, by knife, by club, or maybe modern hands-on violence, by gun or by car.

But if you’re tremendously wealthy, you can practice industrial-scale violence without any manual labor on your own part. You can, say, build a sweatshop factory that will collapse in Bangladesh and kill more people than any hands-on mass murderer ever did, or you can calculate risk and benefit about putting poisons or unsafe machines into the world, as manufacturers do every day. If you’re the leader of a country, you can declare war and kill by the hundreds of thousands or millions. And the nuclear superpowers – the US and Russia – still hold the option of destroying quite a lot of life on Earth.

So do the carbon barons. But when we talk about violence, we almost always talk about violence from below, not above.